Vapor Open Air Tight Insulation Using Stone Wool

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In this course, we first examine what stone wool is, the history, the production and common uses in residential construction for mineral wool insulation. We then go more in detail of designing a wall with durability in mind. We discuss different water/air barriers and the non use of vapor barriers in a design.

 

This training is best suited for both builders and architects. Since we will be discussing multiple options we will also go into a good, better and best option - affordable efficiency is possible with stone wool. Vapor open and air tight is a great design element when designing a durable and energy efficient home.

 

At the end of the presentation, we will discuss actual projects that we have completed with the Vapor Open Air Tight design.


Continuing Education Units (CEUS) 1 hour in

  • Green Business Certification Inc. (GBCI)
  • Building Performance Institute (BPI) NonWholeHouse
  • American Institute of Architects - AIA (HSW) 
  • Certified Green Professional (NARI & CGP)
  • Certified GreenHome Professional (CGHP)
  • AIBD
  • State Architect / Builder License may be applicable
     

Lessons Learned

-Designing a wall with energy efficiency and durability in mind.

-Vapor barriers - do we need them? Learn about how vapor barriers improve the livability and well-being of a structures' occupants.

-Reducing condensation and how to effectively move the dew point.

-Design homes that will dry in all seasons and view actual projects that are vapor open and air tight.


Session sponsor:

Rheem - www.rheem.com

 

Instructor: Dan Edelman

 

Dan Edelman, a high performance building material professional with more than two decades of experience is the Business Development manager for ROCKWOOL insulation, North America. With a project management background and working on job sites since day 1, Dan enjoys explaining both the building science behind design along with the application process. Dan has currently been with ROCKWOOL for over 9 years. 

 

Need CEUS? 

Access the quiz here: https://www.dropbox.com/s/z2l14vmyyql4jni/04082020-Quiz-Vapor%20Open%20Air%20Tight%20-%20No%20Answer.docx?dl=0

 

Looking for the rest of the series?

Part 1: https://youtu.be/Dz8KcsQDBYI

Part 2: https://youtu.be/uX9f7Yoia5U

Part 3: https://youtu.be/QFLRf09yWMQ

Part 4: https://youtu.be/1fp_mbdV4xo

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Comments

  • I'm sure someone will tell me I'm wrong but years ago I looked into embedded energy and carbon in insulation and rockwool is by far the least, short of some recycled denim etc fringe (ha ha) insulation. The 'heat' used is overwhelmed by energy used in plastics to drill for petro chems refine crack and turn it into useable chemical and heat is no small part of this at repeated steps in process. As to shipping costs, Rockwool compressed for shipping takes up no more room per R than any other, though yes it's heavier, but as most material is trucked, the differential for weight of insulation vs vehicle is minimal, ie, the truck weighs, a load of rock wool is about 30% heavier than a load of foam despite it being 400% the weight of insulation HOWEVER when you slice the packs open it will insulate more than 2x what the foam will, cutting load factor to just 15% more than foam, who knows maybe less if you really did the math on a computer instead of a napkin, burp.... ok lunch and learn over back to work Russ
  • Oddly, this material is used in greenhouse industry as planting medium, so feel free to stuff a planter full of old rock wool and plant away, also it's just rock, given time it will turn into sand, admittedly, sitting in a land fill it will take forever, but faster than ceramics glass and unlike decaying plastics won't add pollution load to soils. If you really wanted to break up the stuff some ball bearings, rocks bowling balls and cement mixer would do the trick, as a science experiment. Might make good substitute protection board for foundations, a GC could shave a few bucks off spec projects... chinking large gaps being sealed? log cabins instead of foam rods? I actually think used rock wool would probably work good for attic insulation, dimensionally stable - won't settle and as used material presumably cheaper than fresh from bag, so maybe more competitive with cellulose, everyone's fav cause it's cheap cheap cheap Thanks for course
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